UNDERSTANDING DIGITAL TELEVISION IN SOUTH GIPPSLAND

 

FOSTER NORTH (FOSTER - TOORA - PORT WELSHPOOL - YANAKIE)

 

MOUNT TASSIE (BASS COAST - LATROBE VALLEY - SOUTH GIPPSLAND)

 

Latest Digital TV News:

---  The newest digital channel to watch is Television 4 (Channel 64)  ---  A new interactive Freeview EPG (Electronic Programming Guide) has been released for Freeview EPG endorsed digital equipment  ---  The Australian Government has launched a Free-To-Air Satellite service called VAST for regional customers who can’t receive adequate local TV coverage  ---  Analog broadcasting has been switched off in South Gippsland since the 5th May 2011

 

INTRODUCTION

 

This web guide explains what digital television is, the benefits it provides and the services available to households in the South Gippsland region. In South Gippsland you can now experience digital television right in your own home. The means you can watch your television and experience:

- Clearer Pictures
-
Stereo Sound
-
Widescreen
-
Extra Channels (Television & Radio)
-
Closed Captions
-
Electronic Program Guide

The two main transmitters for your region are:

 

Foster North (Foster - Toora - Port Welshpool - Yanakie)

 

The Foster North transmitter will be broadcasting ABC, Prime, WIN, Southern Cross Ten and SBS in the new digital medium. This service has been fully operational since June 2010.

 

Mount Tassie (Bass Coast - Latrobe Valley - South Gippsland)

 

The Mount Tassie transmitter will be broadcasting ABC, Prime, WIN, Southern Cross Ten and SBS in the new digital medium. This service has been fully operational since May 2005.

 

The digital signal is broadcasted in the same directional phase as the old analog network. This means you do not need to change the direction of your antenna. Digital television is designed to be easier and cheaper to receive, transmit and maintain than the old analog networks. You don’t need to change your television, antenna or cabling systems if you can already receive analog television (logically though if the equipment mentioned is not in good working order, it is recommended to have it fixed).

 

RECEIVING DIGITAL TELEVISION

 

To pick up digital television you either purchase a Digital Set Top Box, Digital HDD Recorder, Digital DVD Recorder or Integrated Digital Television. Once this equipment has been installed you can then watch digital television. To help future proof your Digital equipment, it is recommended to purchase Freeview endorsed HD products. This equipment allows you to receive MPEG2 and the newer MPEG4 video technology and helps you connect to the new enhanced EPG broadcast standard. The older MPEG2 digital equipment (both in SD and HD formats) is still okay to use and the new system isn't expected to be used for another 3 - 5 years. If you are using SD, you can only watch SD channels. If you are using HD, you can view both SD and HD channels. Analog broadcasting will continue to transmit in South Gippsland until 5th May 2011 (you can choose to convert to digital at the shutoff date or switch now to start enjoying the extra channels and services today). When accessing digital television in South Gippsland (Foster North and Mount Tassie) you will need a UHF antenna.

 

Picture: Freeview
 


Picture: UHF Antenna

 

TELEVISION TYPES

 

CRT

 

The cathode ray tube (CRT) is a vacuum tube containing an electron gun (a source of electrons) and a fluorescent screen, with internal or external means to accelerate and deflect the electron beam, used to create images in the form of light emitted from the fluorescent screen. The image may represent electrical waveforms (oscilloscope), pictures (television, computer monitor), radar targets and others. The CRT uses an evacuated glass envelope which is large, deep, heavy, and relatively fragile. Display technologies without these disadvantages, such as flat plasma screens, liquid crystal displays, DLP, OLED displays have replaced CRTs in many applications and are becoming increasingly common as costs decline.
 

Most consumer electronic retailers are steadily removing these types of TV's from there stock inventories and some TV manufactures have completely stopped the production of CRT TV's due to a lack of consumer interest.

 

 


Picture: CRT TV

 

LCD

 

Liquid-colour display televisions (LCD TV) are television sets that use LCD technology to produce images. Benefits of LCD technology include lower weight and reduced power requirements when compared to other display types. Often, LCD television screens can also be used as computer monitors.

 


Picture: LCD TV

 

LED

 

LED-backlit LCD television or LED TV (term used by Samsung Electronics, Toshiba, Philips, and LG Electronics) is an LCD TV that uses LED backlighting.[1] LED's are used for backlighting, instead of fluorescent lights. The term LED TV is disputed and the complaint is that the display is not composed of 100% LEDs and so should not be called LED TV. LEDs in their current form are much too large to be individual pixels on a conventional television. The use of a true LED display is therefore reserved for much larger screens in sports grounds and other commercial locations. LED-backlit LCD TVs do differ from conventional LCD TVs in some important areas:

- They can produce a very bright image with greater contrast and deeper blacks compared with LCD TVs
- With Edge-LED lighting they can be extremely slim (current models on the market are just over 25mm thick)
- They consume much less power (about 40% less compared with an LCD TV of a similar size)
- They can offer a wider color gamut, especially when RGB-LED backlighting is used
- Higher refresh frequency
- Lesser environmental pollution on disposal

 



Picture: LED TV

 

Plasma

 

A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display common to large TV displays (32 inches or larger). Many tiny cells between two panels of glass hold an inert mixture of noble gases. The gas in the cells is electrically turned into plasma which then excites phosphors to emit light. Plasma displays should not be confused with LCD's, another lightweight flatscreen display using different technology.
 


Picture: Plasma TV

 

Media Centre

 

The term media centre refers either to a dedicated computer appliance or to a specialized personal computer software, both of which are adapted for playing various kinds of media (music, movies, photos etc.), and is usually designed to be used as a living-room TV (with remote control). A media centre may also allow watching DVD movies and watching and recording television broadcasts.
 
The media itself may be stored, received by terrestrial, satellite or cable broadcasting or streamed from the internet. Stored media is kept either on a local hard drive or on a (wireless) network attached storage. Some software is capable of doing other tasks, such as finding news (RSS) from the Internet. Media centres are often operated with a remote control, connected to a television set for video output, and can sometimes function as a normal personal computer.
 
A media centre can be purpose-built, modified or created by individuals by adding media centre software to a PC or some other computer, for example an Xbox. Lately, some video game consoles (Playstation 3 and Xbox 360) with their network services can act as a media centre devices by default.
 


Picture: Microsoft Windows Media Centre (Microsoft Windows)

 

 

Picture: Myth TV (Linux)

 

Advisory: If you have an existing analog television, you don’t need to replace it. You can connect to digital TV through the use of a SD or HD set top box.

 

SD (STANDARD DEFINITION)

 

SD (Standard Definition) is the name of the digital signal type that your set top box or digital television receives. All broadcasters have SD for their channels, which allow them to provide widescreen pictures and DVD equivalent picture quality.  The picture resolution achieved on SD is 576i (576 horizontal lines interlaced).

 

SD broadcasts are transmitted at all times (24 hours a day, 7 days a week). SD is broadcasted in MPEG digital stereo sound (CD Quality) with the occasional use of Dolby Digital depending upon the program you’re watching. SD set top boxes can be purchased from as little as $35 depending upon the make, features and quality of components.

 


Picture: Australian Government Accredited Scheme - Digital TV Ready (Standard Definition Devices)

 



Picture: Standard Definition Set Top Box (Humax)

 

Advisory: The most cost effective way of watching digital television is to use a SD set top box. These boxes have come down in price over the years and with most models you should have the ability to connect directly to your TV, VCR or Surround Sound System. In order to watch all digital channels you will need a HD set top box (preferably Freeview endorsed). You may need to purchase extra cables to help connect your SD set top box to multiple pieces of equipment.

 

HD (HIGH DEFINITION)

 

HD (High Definition) is the name of the digital signal type that your set top box or digital television receives. The Australian Government is recommending Australian consumers to buy HD set top boxes as they allow you to watch all channels (SD and HD) and are fully compatible with the new Freeview system that started in May 2009. All broadcasters have HD capabilities but each station has chosen a different path to use this spectrum.

 

This allows the channel providers to provide widescreen pictures that are higher than DVD picture quality.  The picture resolutions achieved on HD are 576p (576 horizontal lines progressive), 720p (720 horizontal lines progressive) and 1080i (1080i horizontal lines interlaced). This means the picture quality can be up to 3 times more vibrant and clearer than SD.

 

HD is broadcasted in MPEG digital stereo sound with the ability to use Dolby Pro Logic, Dolby Digital or Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound depending upon the program you’re watching. HD set top boxes can be purchased from as little as $110 depending upon the make, features and quality of components.

 

Advisory: To achieve the highest possible screen resolution you are better off buying a new television that is designed and capable of handling the HD standard (preferably Freeview endorsed). If you are going to watch digital television on your old analog equipment, you will only need to connect a HD set top box to watch both SD and HD channels. You may need to purchase extra cables to help connect your HD set top box to multiple pieces of equipment.

 


Picture: Australian Government Accredited Scheme - Digital TV Ready (High Definition Devices)

 


Picture: High Definition Set Top Box & Personal Video Recorder (TiVO)

 


Picture: High Definition Set Top Box & Personal Video Recorder (Telstra T-Box)

 

CONNECTING THE SET TOP BOX

 

You can connect your set top box in 6 ways:

- Connect the set top box with an AV cable. This method achieves excellent picture and sound quality. This cable uses 3 wires (colour coded), to establish the Picture on 1 wire and the other 2 wires for Left and Right Audio. Connect your antenna cable in the socket labelled ANTENNA on the back of the set top box. Then connect the AV cable to the AV OUT and on the TV or VCR to the AV IN. Switch the TV or VCR to AV and you have your digital television.
-
Connect the set top box with an RF cable. This method achieves an above average picture and sound quality, but allows you to primarily record your digital television programs onto a VCR or DVD R/W unit. This cable is singular and usually black in colour. Connect your antenna cable in the socket labelled ANTENNA on the back of the set top box. On the set top box you need to connect the RF cable to the RF OUT and on the TV or VCR to the RF IN. Retune your TV or VCR to find the channel the set top box broadcasts on and you have your digital television.
- Connect the set top box with both cable methods (AV and RF). This method allows you to watch and record your digital television programs and still watch Videos and DVD’s from your existing analog device.
- Connect the set top box via a HDMI cable.
-
Connect the set top box via a DVI cable.
- Connect the set top box via a SCART cable.
- Connect the set top box via a Y-Pr-Pb cable.

Advisory: To avoid damaging any of your existing television equipment or your set top box, you should always read the instruction manual. This will help reduce the risk of voiding your rights to the products warranty. On older TV units, you may only have RF as the connection type; if that’s the case make sure the set top box you buy suits this.

 

PICTURE QUALITY

 

Digital television removes all existing pictures problems that analog television used to have. With analog the most common problem was ghosting. This resulted usually from electrical/radio interference. Digital doesn’t have any of these problems and overall should result in a sharper and clearer picture of equal quality as experienced when watching DVD media on your television.

 

Advisory: Like any form of broadcasting your geographical location, severe weather situations and antenna set-up will affect the performance of your digital signal. If this does happen, expect to have pixel breakage and sound cutting out problems affecting your television picture.

 


Picture: Difference between SD and HD picture formats

 

PICTURE SIZE

 

Digital television broadcasts your programs through alternative picture formats. Unlike analog television, the picture was displayed to you in 4.3 Aspect Ratio Boxed, where as digital is designed to display your picture in 4.3 and 16.9 Aspect Ratio Widescreen.

 

Most programs nowadays are recorded and released from television and media companies in widescreen, much like what you see in the Cinema and on DVD. This new format allows the viewer to see more information on screen and provides a more natural panoramic view for your eyes.

 

If you have a widescreen television you will now be able to fully experience your television programs in their true picture size. If you don’t have a widescreen television, the majority of set top boxes allow you to switch the picture size between the following formats:

 

4:3 Aspect Ratio Boxed

 

The digital picture is broadcasted and converted into the old analog boxed format. This is useful when watching digital television on early model televisions. When watching old television programs, they will still be displayed to you in the old boxed format with a black band going right around the picture.

 

16:9 Aspect Ratio Widescreen

 

The digital picture is broadcasted into a widescreen format that is specially designed for large-scale televisions. These types of television are usually above 68cm in size and are commonly seen in CRT, LCD, Plasma and Rear Projection formats. When watching programs in widescreen, you will commonly see two narrow black bands running across the top and bottom of your television.

 

Picture: Difference between Standard 4:3 and Widescreen 16:9 picture formats

 

Advisory: Remember that you don’t need to throw away your old television and replace it with an expensive widescreen model. Since digital television broadcasts your programs in different picture formats, you just instruct your set top box to display your program in the picture format that best suits your television.

 

SOUND OUTPUT

 

The audio output from digital television is broadcasted in MPEG Stereo. This allows new and old televisions to use both left and right speakers together to achieve an audio quality equivalent to CD Stereo. If you have a Surround Sound System and the program your watching was encoded in Dolby Pro Logic, Dolby Digital or Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound you will hear the program in Cinema/DVD quality.

 

Advisory: Remember that you don’t need to buy a surround sound system or upgrade your existing speaker system. Since the digital television audio output can be regulated, you just change the sound mode on your set top box to best suit the television or audio environment that you’re using.

 

BROADCASTING FEATURES

 

With the new digital spectrum, television broadcasters now offer:

 

SD (Standard Definition) Channels

 

SD (Standard Definition) is the name of the digital signal type that your set top box or digital television receives. All broadcasters have SD for their channels, which allow them to provide widescreen pictures and DVD equivalent picture quality.  The picture resolution achieved on SD is 576i (576 horizontal lines interlaced).  Some broadcasters have used there SD spectrum to release extra channels. SD set top boxes can’t receive HD broadcasts.

 

 

 

 


Picture: ABC1 (Channel 2)

 

 

 

 


Picture: SBS One
(Channel 3)

 

 

 

 


Picture: Southern Cross Ten
(Channel 5)

 

 

 

 


Picture: Prime
(Channel 6)

 

 

 

 

 


Picture: WIN
(Channel 8)

 

 

 

 

 


Picture: ABC2
(Channel 22)

 


 


Picture: ABC3
(Channel 23)

 

 

 

 


Picture: SBS Two
(Channel 32)
 

 

 


Picture: Eleven
(Channel 55)

 

 

 


Picture: 7 Two
(Channel 62)
 

 


 


Picture: Television 4 (Channel 64)
 

 



Picture: GO!
(Channel 88)

 

HD (High Definition) Channels

 

HD (High Definition) is the name of the digital signal type that your set top box or digital television receives. All broadcasters have HD capabilities but each station has chosen a different path to use this spectrum. This allows them to provide widescreen pictures that are higher than DVD picture quality.

 

The picture resolutions achieved on HD are 576p (576 horizontal lines progressive), 720p (720 horizontal lines progressive) and 1080i (1080i horizontal lines interlaced).  This means the picture quality can be up to 3 times more vibrant and clearer than SD. Some broadcasters have used there HD spectrum to release extra digital only channels. HD set top boxes can receive both SD and HD broadcasts.

 

Picture: ABC News 24 (Channel 24)
 

Picture: SBS HD (Channel 30)

 

Picture: One HD (Channel 50)
 

Picture: 7 Mate (Channel 63)
 

Picture: GEM (Channel 80)

 

Radio Channels

 

You can listen to a few Digital Radio stations provided by the ABC and SBS through your set top box or associated device.

 


Picture: SBS Radio 1 & SBS Radio 2
(Channels 38 & 39)

 


Picture: ABC DiG Radio & ABC DiG Radio Jazz
(Channels 200 & 201)

 

Advisory: To activate Digital Radio, you need to press the button marked Radio or TV/Radio from your remote control.

 

Closed Captions

 

English subtitles for the hearing impaired are now broadcasted on top of your favourite programs.

 


Picture: Closed Captions during a Children’s TV program

 

Advisory: To activate Closed Captions, you need to press the button marked CC, Captions, Subtitles or Text then 801 from your remote control.

 

EPG (Electronic Program Guide)

 

An EPG can deliver information on your screen about the program you’re watching and what’s on next. Some EPG systems can now deliver up to 14 days of information and can be used to record your favourite shows directly to a HDD (Media Centre), VHS Tape, DVD-RW or PVR device.

 

 

Picture: Freeview EPG

 

Advisory: To activate the EPG, you need to press the button marked EPG, NNP or Guide from your remote control.

 

DIGITAL TELEVISION FREQUENCIES

 

The following lists are the frequencies and channels available in your area:

 

Foster North (Foster - Toora - Port Welshpool - Yanakie)

 

Digital Television/Radio Channels

 

ABC  UHF 56 725.5 MHZ  On Air

 

ABC1  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 2

ABC2  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 22

ABC3  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 23

ABC News 24  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 24

ABC DiG Radio  RC  Channel 200

ABC DiG Jazz  RC  Channel 201

 

SBS  UHF 59 746.5 MHZ  On Air

 

SBS One  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 3

SBS HD  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 30          

SBS Two  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 32

SBS Radio 1  RC  Channel 38

SBS Radio 2  RC  Channel 39

 

Southern Cross Ten  UHF 53 704.5 MHZ  On Air

 

Southern Cross Ten  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 5

One HD  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 50

Eleven  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 55

 

Prime  UHF 62 767.5 MHZ  On Air

 

Prime  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 6

7 Two on Prime  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 62

7 Mate on Prime  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 63

Television 4  SD  Channel 64

 

WIN  UHF 65 788.5 MHZ  On Air

 

WIN  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 8

GEM  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 80

GO!  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 88

 

Terms

 

SD - Standard Definition Channel  HD - High Definition Channel  RC - Radio Channel  CC - Closed Captioning  EPG - Electronic Program Guide             

                       

Mount Tassie (Bass Coast - Latrobe Valley - South Gippsland)

 

Digital Television/Radio Channels

 

ABC  UHF 42 627.5 MHZ  On Air

 

ABC1  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 2

ABC2  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 22

ABC3  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 23

ABC News 24  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 24

ABC DiG Radio  RC  Channel 200

ABC DiG Jazz  RC  Channel 201

 

SBS  UHF 30 543.5 MHZ  On Air

 

SBS One  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 3

SBS HD  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 30          

SBS Two  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 32

SBS Radio 1  RC  Channel 38

SBS Radio 2  RC  Channel 39

 

Southern Cross Ten  UHF 39 606.5 MHZ  On Air

 

Southern Cross Ten  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 5

One HD  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 50

Eleven  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 55

 

Prime  UHF 33 564.5 MHZ  On Air

 

Prime  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 6

7 Two on Prime  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 62

7 Mate on Prime  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 63

Television 4  SD  Channel 64

 

WIN  UHF 36 585.5 MHZ  On Air

 

WIN  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 8

GEM  HD  CC  EPG  Channel 80

GO!  SD  CC  EPG  Channel 88

 

Terms

 

SD - Standard Definition Channel  HD - High Definition Channel  RC - Radio Channel  CC - Closed Captioning  EPG - Electronic Program Guide             

 

DIGITAL TELEVISION TRANSMITTERS

 

The following shows the location of your local digital television transmitter and the area it serves:

 

Foster North (Foster - Toora - Port Welshpool - Yanakie)

 


Picture: This coverage is indicative only. Reception will also be affected by external factors such as local terrain and quality of receiving equipment.

 

Mount Tassie (Bass Coast - Latrobe Valley - South Gippsland)

 


Picture: This coverage is indicative only. Reception will also be affected by external factors such as local terrain and quality of receiving equipment.

 

WHAT DO THE CHANNELS OFFER

 

Here is an example of each channels genre/type of audience:

 

Channel Number

Channel Name

Genre/Type/Target Audience

Resolution

Current Use

2

ABC1

General Entertainment

Target Audience: 35 + Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

3

SBS One

Foreign Programs / General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + English/Non-English Speaking Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

5

Southern Cross Ten

General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

6

Prime

General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

8

WIN

General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

22

ABC2

Children's Entertainment / General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 - 34 Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

23

ABC3

Children's Entertainment

Target Audience: 5 - 15 Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

24

ABC News 24

News

Target Audience: 16 + Male & Female

720p HD

Active channel

30

SBS HD

Foreign Programs / General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + English/Non-English Speaking Male & Female

720p HD

Active channel (Simulcasts SBS One)

32

SBS Two

Foreign Programs / General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + English/Non-English Speaking Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

50

One HD

Sport / General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + Male & Female

1080i HD

Active channel

55

Eleven

Youth / General Entertainment

Target Audience: 13 - 29 Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

62

7 Two

General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

63

7 Mate

General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 - 49 Male

1080i HD

Active channel

64

Television 4

Products / Services / Sport / Travel / Fashion / Beauty / Cars / Community Programming

Target Audience: 16 +

576i SD

Active channel

80

GEM

General Entertainment

Target Audience: 35 + Female

1080i HD

Active channel

88

GO! Youth / General Entertainment

Target Audience: 16 + Male & Female

576i SD

Active channel

  

FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS

Digital TV Australia Wide - VAST (Viewer Access Satellite Television)
Starts: 2011
Website: www.mysattv.com.au

The Government will implement a satellite service to provide digital television to viewers in regional blackspot areas. "All regional Australians will now receive the same television services as people in the cities," said the Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Senator Stephen Conroy. "This is a fantastic outcome for people in regional Australia, many of whom have received limited television services for many years." "This historic decision will dramatically improve the choice and quality of television services for regional Australia as we move towards digital switchover." "For the first time all free-to-air digital television services, including the original three commercial and two national channels, as well as new digital services such as ABC2, ABC3, ABC News 24, SBS TWO, GO!, 7TWO, 7MATE, GEM, 11 and ONE HD, will be available to all Australians, no matter where they live." "The satellite service will provide regional viewers with access to the local news currently broadcast in their TV licence area via a dedicated local news channel."

 

While the final cost of the digital satellite broadcasting service will be determined following negotiations between broadcasters and satellite service providers, the Government is committing $40 million per year over the four-year forward estimates to build and operate the service, for the potential benefit of up to 247,000 households across Australia. This is an ongoing Government commitment. Under an agreement reached with all television broadcasters across Australia, broadcasters will upgrade more than 100 existing regional analog "self-help" transmission facilities to operate in digital, while the Government will fully fund and build a new digital satellite broadcasting service for regional viewers who are unable to receive digital television from those facilities. The measures are part of Australias ongoing switchover to digital-only television and will be in place before analog services are switched off in each regional broadcast license area. Viewers who currently rely on "self-help" sites that will be upgraded by broadcasters under this agreement will simply need to install a high definition set-top-box to access a full suite of digital television channels.


Any regional households not able to receive digital television from the upgraded "self-help" sites will be served by the new satellite, which will also carry the full suite of digital channels. In order to access the new satellite service, these households will need to install a satellite dish. "The Government will provide a satellite conversion subsidy to eligible households currently served by "self-help" transmission sites which are not upgraded to digital by the broadcasters," Senator Conroy said. "This landmark agreement would not be possible without the cooperation of Australias free-to-air broadcasters and I would like to acknowledge their constructive approach to digital switchover." Senator Conroy said that the Government will be writing to "self-help" transmission licensees detailing the new measures as well as providing further information to local communities.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION

 

To find out more about Digital Television, visit these websites:

 

Australian Government - Are you READY for Digital TV?

http://www.digitalready.gov.au/

 

Digital Terrestrial Television in Australia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_terrestrial_television_in_Australia

 

Freeview - More for Free

http://www.freeview.com.au

 

TV Tonight - Australia's leading TV blog

http://www.tvtonight.com.au

 

What's On The Tube - Sharing our growing passion for Television
http://whatsonthetube.net

 

ABC

http://www.abc.net.au

 

SBS

http://www.sbs.com.au

 

Southern Cross Ten

http://www.scmedia.com.au

 

Prime

http://www.iprime.com.au

 

WIN

http://www.wintv.com.au

 

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Understanding Digital Television In South Gippsland
 

Web Site Established: 20/07/2009 - Web Site Designer: Simon Maher - Web Site Last Updated: 21/09/2011
 

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